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aaronbroege

Aaron Broege is a visiting assistant professor at Carleton College in Northfield, MN. His research focuses on signaling pathways involved in differentiation of osteoclasts, cells that break down bone.
aaronbroege has written 13 posts for The Sensitive Scientist

Exploring Questions in Biochemistry – A Colleague’s Assignment

Writing assignments are a fantastic ways for student to engage with and process material. Using the internet as a platform for student work encourages students to engage with a community beyond the classroom. A friend and colleague of mine, Dr. Salmaan Khan, who is teaching a biochemistry laboratory class at the University of Minnesota has … Continue reading

Primary Literature Jigsaw

I recently authored a guest blog post for the University of Minnesota’s Techniques in Teaching and Learning. In this post I outline my approach to integrating primary literature into the Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology course I am currently teaching at a local liberal arts college. If you read it, I would appreciate any feedback, … Continue reading

Science Networking Project: The Handout

I would like to thank all of the individuals on Twitter and those who have commented on the blog for help in thinking about how best to use Twitter in the classroom.  Below is the handout I will be giving the students the first day of class.  Feel free to make suggestions for improvement, or … Continue reading

Sunday Night Sketches

Other responsibilities have kept me from updating my blog. Until I post something more substantial, I took a break from work this evening to draw. My attempt at the macrophage is for Heather over at Escaping Anergy and inspired by a couple of the images found here. Plus, the osteoclast and macrophage, both derived from the … Continue reading

Twitter Project: The Response

Thanks to some helpful re-tweets, some interesting discussion on Twitter and in the comments section of my previous post produced some suggestions and highlighted some challenges that may be encountered when trying to integrate social media into the classroom. I wanted to take a moment to summarize this discussion here, which, I hope, will generate … Continue reading

Science Networking Project: Twitter Revisited

In my initial post on using Twitter in the classroom, I had only begun to explore the idea as a method of information retrieval – a way for students to keep up with current findings. Since then I have been exploring ways to incorporate Twitter in more active ways, developing activities around the use of … Continue reading

The Periodic Table of Haiku

In my preparing future faculty course this morning, @IleneDawn introduced another interesting example of merging art and science pedagogy – The Periodic Table of Haiku. A description of the project from the link above: “The primary objective of the Haiku project was to integrate chemistry and creative writing. By working with the characteristics of Haiku … Continue reading

Osteoclasts have feelings too.

This week has been quite busy for me, and I haven’t gotten to address a number of things on the blog that I would like to (including the #womanspace outrage that is rightfully flooding the twitter-sphere/blogosphere). However, I thought I would take the time to post something quick and fun. My research focuses on signals … Continue reading

The Beauty in Science

When science becomes art the result is truly remarkable. Enjoy the images found in the Art of Science 2011 Gallery. For those who prefer to wear their art, the New York Times recently posted a slideshow of some fantastic science tattoos. Enjoy!

Michael Nielsen and the open science revolution

@IleneDawn tweeted a link to an interesting video featureing Michael Nielsen, a pioneer in quantum computing and author of the recently published “Reinventing Discovery: The New Era of Networked Science.” (Just purchased for my nook!) This is a timely find, following up on my recent post aiming to explore novel or interesting ways to integrate twitter … Continue reading

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